Category Archives: History

What explains Donald Trump’s appeal to so many Americans?

Emeritus Professor Garrett Ward Sheldon has provided us with a shrewd judicious analysis of Donald Trump’s great appeal to many people, not only in America, but around the world. This is an excellent, quality analysis that rings trues. Indeed, it makes those seeing his appeal as an issue of education and social standing look vacuously snobbish.

*****

Trumpism is the Right Mix of Old and New

The combination of old American tradition and new American innovation make the Trump movement truly unique and momentous.

By Garrett Ward Sheldon, American Greatness, October 7, 2020

The political movement around Donald Trump is the greatest in American history since the American Revolution of 1776. Other major movements: Thomas Jefferson’s “Second American Revolution” of 1800; the Abolition of Slavery and rise of industrialism around the Civil War; the development of the Welfare State under FDR’s New Deal, are all major, but are not as momentous as this movement around Trump.

          This is because the current movement is a unique mixture of Old and New never before seen in history.

          As I described in a previous article in American Greatness (“How I Knew Trump Would Win in 2016 and Why He Will Win Again”), Donald Trump embodies traditional American notions of freedom, equality, faith, family, and patriotism so brilliantly described in Alexis de Tocqueville’s DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA, going back 400 years to the New England Puritans and the Virginia settlers. Such cultural values, as the conservative philosopher Edmund Burke showed, do not change over hundreds, perhaps thousands of years. Although under assault for perhaps 100 years (especially during the past 50 years) they remain permanent American political culture, ready to be revived through the Trumpian movement.

          But what makes this restoration of traditional American political culture unique, is its combination with the New: the most advanced, cutting-edge, “progressive” developments in economics, technology and international relations.

          For, the old Liberal Democratic system of centralized government protecting old, outmoded economic monopolies, and global control based on corrupt alliances and outmoded technology, is actually LESS compatible with traditional American values of freedom, invention, creativity, competition and discovery. The newest technology is naturally decentralized.

          We see the contrast all around us in communication and business. In the place of four “news” cable networks with one Liberal message, we have hundreds of internet news and commentary blogs on every perspective. Big Med, Big Pharma, and Big Agra – preserved by government restrictions and regulations, replaced by a free market of alternative medicine and treatments, high tech diagnoses and treatment and a real progress in healthcare and nutrition. Ironically, the COVID-19 that was designed to destroy the American economy and Trump actually advanced this movement as online medical treatment, education, military (the Space Force) and commerce have all advanced.

In the place of monolithic State Education we will soon have School Choice with innovative mixtures of public and private, online and onsite, and practical learning based on free speech, examining all perspectives rather than Liberal identity-politics indoctrination. And many Americans are moving out of the cities, with their Democrat-sponsored riots, and to the country and small towns (another American tradition) where they can work remotely online and enjoy safe, quiet and pleasant communities, leaving the Democrat cities to rot like ancient Roman ruins.

The effect on international relations is likely that the Old World Order of USA/EU/China will be replaced with: USA/Great Britain/India/ Eastern Europe/peaceful Arab Countries/ Israel. Instead of Global control by a few will be multiple individual and regional alliances compatible with both traditional American values and advanced technology.

          It is this combination of the Old and the New that makes the Trump Movement unique and momentous.

A Brief History of Antifa Part II

A Brief History of Antifa: Part II

Antifa in the United States

by Soeren Kern

  • “The only long-term solution to the fascist menace is to undermine its pillars of strength in society grounded not only in white supremacy but also in ableism, heteronormativity, patriarchy, nationalism, transphobia, class rule, and many others.” — Mark Bray, “Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook,” 2017.
  • “They’re coming from other cities. That cost money. They didn’t do this on their own. Somebody’s paying for this…. What Antifa is doing is they’re basically hijacking the black community as their army. They instigate, they antagonize, they get these young black men and women to go out there and do stupid things, and then they disappear off into the sunset.” — Bernard Kerik, former commissioner of the New York City Police Department.
  • The coordinated violence raises questions about how Antifa is financed. The Alliance for Global Justice (AFGJ) is an organizing group that serves as a fiscal sponsor to numerous radical left-wing initiatives, according to Influence Watch, a research group that collects data on advocacy organizations, foundations and donors…. The Open Society Foundations, Tides Foundation, Arca Foundation, Surdna Foundation, Public Welfare Foundation, and the Brightwater Fund have all made contributions to AFGJ, according to Influence Watch.
  • One of the groups funded by AFGJ is called Refuse Fascism … an offshoot of the Radical Communist Party (RCP)…. The group’s slogan states: “This System Cannot Be Reformed, It Must Be Overthrown!”

Read the rest here…

POC immigration

Australia is constantly slandered as a (white) racist country. The hordes of POCs trying to get into Australia would seem to disprove that slander. Of course, that does not stop the slander. It does not stop the slander because the truth or falsehood of the claim (it is false) is not at issue. It is slander as a political tool. It will keep going because it is an effective tool in the worldwide Marxist campaign to destroy white influence and white civilization.

Those white countries that allow extensive POC immigration now find many of those who benefited out on the streets condemning their white hosts as racists and tearing down statues of figures once considered important in developing the standard of living that those POCs migrated to enjoy.

One wonders how long the tolerance of this insane situation will go on.

What it means to be a people

Each year, approaching Australia Day. I repost my essay on Edmund Burke’s ideas about what it means to be a people. Aboriginals and those of Aboriginal ancestry are now part of a seamless nation called Australia. See the next post for the extended argument.

EDMUND BURKE ON WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A ‘PEOPLE’

When Edmund Burke claimed in An Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs that the French Revolution ‘was a wild attempt to methodize anarchy; to perpetuate and fix disorder…that it was a foul, impious, monstrous thing, wholly out of the course of moral nature,’[1] he was targeting a particular theory of political organization now known as ‘social contract theory’. It is important to understand that for Burke social contract theory not only determines the form of political organization of a particular people but the accompanying social organization as well.[2]

Read on…

How Aboriginals are abused by the new PC paternalism

by J.D. Morecambe

This article appeared in the August issue of Spectator Australia. The author has kindly allowed me to reproduce it here. There are few issues more important in Australia than the traitorous plan to set up a system of apartheid in which a superior class of Australians become the pensioners of the slaving majority.

But know, that I alone am king of me.
I am as free as nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began,
When wild in woods the noble savage ran.

Dryden

From the Roman historian Tacitus’ praise of the barbarians in the first century AD to Rousseau’s Treatise in the eighteenth, the idea of a pure and morally unsullied savage, existing in a state of nature, free from the decadent moral baseness of civilisation, has saturated the western intellect for millennia. Despite our academic pretensions to cold objectivity, we moderns are no less prone to such romantic forgeries; we continue to lament the comfort and success of our civilisation to this day, and have slipped into worshipping the ‘Noble Savages’ of our own continent – the Australian Aboriginals.

The Australian Aboriginal population’s remarkable achievement of surviving on this hostile continent for tens of thousands of years is what Geoffrey Blainey called the ‘Triumph of the Nomads’, and is rightly studied and applauded. Yet, today, a confected, Arcadian image of Aboriginal culture has come to dominate the academies of the nation. This image is the driving force behind millions of dollars in funding for indigenous studies centres, research, courses, colleges and more, and has given rise to a new pseudo-aboriginal culture that carries with it all the pomp and circumstance of a fledgling nation; its own ceremonies, its own cultural values and its own political goals. Yet it is a caricature as false as J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan.

Continue reading How Aboriginals are abused by the new PC paternalism

Edmund Burke on what it means to be a 'people'

When Edmund Burke claimed in An Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs that the French Revolution ‘was a wild attempt to methodize anarchy; to perpetuate and fix disorder…that it was a foul, impious, monstrous thing, wholly out of the course of moral nature,’[1] he was targeting a particular theory of political organization now known as ‘social contract theory’. It is important to understand that for Burke social contract theory not only determines the form of political organization of a particular people but the accompanying social organization as well.[2]

The early theorists of social contract were Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), John Locke (1632-1704) and Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), Hobbes being considered the first to introduce the idea. Burke was clearly familiar with the writings of these political philosophers. There are recognizable references to Hobbes (Leviathan) and Locke (The Second Treatise of Government) in his speeches and writings, although he does not mention them by name. He was scathing about Rousseau, reducing his entire philosophy (including the Social Contract) to one of vanity, claiming that ‘with this vice he was possessed to a degree little short of madness,’ and that ‘it is plain that the present rebellion [in France] was its legitimate offspring.’ [3] In other words, he attributed the ‘wild attempt to methodize anarchy [and] to perpetuate and fix disorder’ in France to Rousseau as a major influence.

Continue reading Edmund Burke on what it means to be a 'people'

What’s the connection between Bruce Pascoe and Cardinal Pell?

Bruce Pascoe’s history of the Aboriginals before European settlement is the way the story should be. His DARK EMU is the story that best fits the times and the prevailing ‘moral’ mood. Cardinal Pell is in jail convicted of child sexual abuse because that’s the way the story should be. That’s the story that suits the mood and the feelings of his accusers. The established and observable detail makes no difference in both cases. Those established and observable details just give one particular scenario of what is alleged true and just. It is a narrative that has no privilege.

One may ask where this madness comes from. Well, the immediate source is the academic precinct where the purveyors of Marxism and postmodernism tell their students what to say and think. More remote is the dialectic of Hegel whose metaphysics has a line back to the Greek Heraclitus. The idea is that reality is in constant flux, constant change. In Marx’s materialist dialectic reality is conflictual.

Hegel, and Marx following him, proposed that the world is not only in flux but constantly evolving. The social ‘truths’ of Marx’s superstructure are generated by the production relations and economic base. If the base is bad, so are the ‘truths’. Capitalism, a market economy for most of us, is a very bad base. In time, we will evolve (perhaps with some violent help) away from that badness.

Of course, few people who swallow the Marxist and postmodernist scenarios will be ready to defend their social creed with chapter and verse of their Scripture. No, most have only a vague idea of the theoretical tangle. But they have a concrete-solid mentality and they feel the vibe. That’s the important thing.

That’s why Louise Milligan does not reply to criticism of her poisonous book about Cardinal Pell. Nor does she answer the heavy criticism of the court case and the appeal by legal academics and professionals around the world. We’re all just a pack of unfeeling monsters who sympathise with clerical paedophiles rather than the victims – heartless people who don’t feel the prescribed vibe.

The same holds for Bruce Pascoe who refuses to explain why he calls himself indigenous when the records shows no Aboriginal origin. Indeed, the records show, as does his pink complexion, that his ancestors come from the British Isles.

All this explains why Australia finds itself in 2019 dumbed-down and degraded. We are in an age of unreason.

The Epicentre of Our History

By Keith Windschuttle, Quadrant 12 November 2019

Inventing and Manipulating History

When Julia Gillard was Minister for Education in the Rudd government in 2008 she appointed a committee to rewrite the national schools curriculum from primary school to year 10. When the curriculum’s compulsory Aboriginal content was published it became a controversial issue. The Coalition opposition under Tony Abbott called it “political correctness run riot” and a ”black armband” view of Australian history, saying it placed too much emphasis on indigenous perspectives and very little on the nation’s British and European political and cultural heritage.

Nonetheless, indigenous studies still remain a core concept within the national curriculum. The academics and bureaucrats responsible never gave up their objective to make it compulsory for all Australian schoolchildren. Today, much of the content set in place by Gillard is now being updated to accommodate the arrival of a new and far more radical set of ideas about traditional Aboriginal culture and society. This is largely the result of an acceptance within the education system of the book, Dark Emu, by the self-described indigenous author Bruce Pascoe.

Read on…