Category Archives: Political

Life Cycle of a nation – Is the warning too late?

How to Avoid the Life Cycle and Death Spiral of a Republic

A wise Jerusalem is better than an innocent Eden.

By Garrett Ward Sheldon • August 7, 2020

To understand the extraordinary events in America today, it is helpful to look at the ancient wisdom of Greece and Rome. And as the wise historian Thucydides said, “If we forget the errors of the past, we are doomed to repeat them.” The classical Greek authors Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, as well as the Romans Cicero and St. Augustine, explain much of what we are experiencing in politics today. A certain textbook, The History of Political Theory: Ancient Greece to Modern America, may also be helpful in this endeavor.

The ancient Greco-Roman historian Polybius (200-118 B.C.) developed a theory of the “lifecycle” of a republic. Like a human being, a republic is born, is young, matures, grows old, and dies. The United States was born in 1776 (our Declaration of Independence) and 1789 (the ratification of our Constitution); was a youth in the late 18th and early 19th centuries; you might say was adolescent in the mid-1800’s (during our Civil War) and matured in the industrial age of late 19th and early 20th centuries. But, by the mid-20th century, especially after World War II, our country grew old, and beginning in the 1960s, frail, sickly, and mentally-impaired.

Like human beings, elderly republics become weak and sickly, sad and demented before they die completely: into anarchy and lawlessness, or tyranny and dictatorship. A society shows its old age in moral weakness, political corruption, decadence, and depravity. 

Read on…

George Soros’ revolutionary moment

Billionaire George Soros driven by his unquenchable hatred is in an eternal battle with Christian/European civilisation. Soros belongs to a group of left-wing billionaires who have spent their lives working to dismantle 1500 years of Christian/European civilization. They have booked success after success over the last fifty years. With the Corona virus, Soros thinks the pandemic has provided his powerful group with the chance to realise the goals of their unrelenting ideological agenda.

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George Soros: We’re now in ‘revolutionary moment’ that allows us to achieve the ‘inconceivable’

In a new interview, the left-wing billionaire called the coronavirus pandemic ‘the crisis of my lifetime.’

May 15, 2020 (LifeSiteNews) –

Left-wing billionaire George Soros has indicated that the coronavirus pandemic paves the way for societal changes previously thought impossible, calling it “the crisis of my lifetime.” Soros had lived through the Second World War as a youth.

“Even before the pandemic hit, I realized that we were in a revolutionary moment where what would be impossible or even inconceivable in normal times had become not only possible, but probably absolutely necessary,” he said during an interview on May 11.

Soros also said that “Europe is facing several existential dangers.”

He was “particularly concerned about the survival of the EU because it is an incomplete union.” While, according to the Hungarian-born billionaire, the European Union was “in the process of being created,” that process “was never completed.”

Thus, Soros said the EU was “exceptionally vulnerable – more vulnerable than the US not just because it is an incomplete union but also because it is based on the rule of law.”

Read the rest here…

They are changing the essence of Australia

The continent of Australia was settled overwhelmingly by people from the British Isles. The people brought their full range of customs, traditions, religion and system of law and government. It was the basis of a new nation that developed and evolved through the decades. Though having its origin in the people of the British Isles, the Australian people in the 1950s were a people distinct from their cousins in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. We were Australia. There was no other Australia.

If by immigration our political class changes the ethnic, social and political basis of the Australian population, they will change Australia. Nobody would suggest that China would be improved by an immigration of a number of white people that amounted to one twenty-fifth of the Chinese population and rising. Similarly, nobody would recommend to the Indian people a massive immigration of white people to their continent.

The Political Economy of Edmund Burke: A New Perspective

Nobuhiko Nakazawa is Professor of the History of Economic Thought at Kansai University, Osaka, Japan.

In this essay I will throw new light on a relatively neglected aspect of Edmund Burke’s (1730–97) economic thought.1 Most scholars have recognized its central assumptions as advocacy of a freely competitive market economy and justification of laissez-faire commercial policies. But this conventional interpretation is unsatisfactory and incomplete. There have been very few extensive studies of what Burke meant by political economy, although he frequently used this term and prided himself on being a political economist.

The first section of this paper will present enough documentary evidence to sketch the scope of Burke’s political economy. What he meant by political economy was different from the classical school of political economy, not to mention modern sophisticated economics. Rather, it was much more akin to what is now called public finance. The second section will describe the moral nature of his political economy in relation to that of his politics. To him, political economy was an essential constituent of his politics of prudence. The third section will focus on his prudent choice of economic policies, and how his political economy distanced itself from theoretical laissez-faire dogma.

Read on…

Educational pluralism and sphere sovereignty

During the seven-decade political struggle in the Netherlands to allow parents to select schools corresponding to their religious convictions, Abraham Kuyper articulated a concept of “sphere sovereignty” that translates, in policy terms, into principled structural pluralism. That Dutch experience, and its resolution in the “Pacification” of 1917, is highly relevant for the present situation in the United States: popular revulsion against the condescension and intolerance of a liberal elite toward the values and interests of many of their fellow-citizens, leading to deep political and social as well as cultural divides…read on

Understanding Islam IX – Can the West rediscover its core?

UNDERSTANDING ISLAM IX
Grasping the Nettle Part 1
THE WEST CAN IT REDISCOVER ITS CORE?
By Paul Stenhouse MSC

MUCH IS made of the potential for global economic and social unrest from the millions of desperate refugees flowing into Europe from war-ravaged Syria, Iraq, the Horn of Africa, Central Africa and Afghanistan [2016].

This is the same Europe of which Pope John-Paul II wrote in 2003: ‘European culture gives the impression of “silent apostasy,” on the part of people who have all that they need, and who live as if God does not exist’.[1]

Many if not most of the refugees are Muslim, and the countries they are fleeing – along with much of the Islamic and Arab world – are infested with Islamic radicals, fundamentalists and extremists who have declared a holy war on the West. Continue reading Understanding Islam IX – Can the West rediscover its core?

Thomas Jefferson and academic freedom

Thomas Jefferson’s Conception of ‘Academic Freedom’ and Its Current Condition in American Higher Education

Garrett Ward Sheldon
The John Morton Beaty Professor of Political and Social Sciences, The University of Virginia’s College at Wise.

‘Here we are not afraid to follow the truth wherever it may lead, nor to tolerate any error, so long as reason is left free to combat it.’ -Thomas Jefferson

THOMAS JEFFERSON’S CONCEPTION OF ‘Academic Freedom’ became the standard of modern intellectual progress in America and the world. Its components of both individual freedom of inquiry in expression and debate along with lively, free and tolerant academic community were seen as essential to all other forms of progress: political, economic, social and ethical. This Jeffersonian ideal of Academic Freedom in the university and all its positive effects on the rest of American Society has come under assault throughout history from religious bigotry, social intolerance, and political ideology, most recently from the federal government’s expansion of the Title IX law during the past six years. It almost destroyed university knowledge and learning, the lively academic community as well as their attendant social and personal benefits. Continue reading Thomas Jefferson and academic freedom

Vatican II’s (lost) condemnations of communism

 

LifeSite Editor’s note: The lost condemnations of communism prepared for the Second Vatican Council but later discarded and forgotten are now being made available to the public in an English translation for the first time by LifeSiteNews.

The translations, by LifeSite’s Matthew Cullinan Hoffman, are based on the drafts of documents contained in the official acts of the council’s preparatory commissions.

The documents contain an extensive plan for a coordinated and global effort to counteract the influence of Marxism and communism worldwide and “shatter its audacity.” However, following the takeover of the council’s commissions by the ultra-liberal “Rhine group” bishops, the condemnations were discarded and all attempts to explicitly condemn communism and Marxism were rejected. Continue reading Vatican II’s (lost) condemnations of communism