‘Cultural Marxism in the University is Destroying American Education’

Professor Garrett Ward Sheldon on the Problem of Cultural Marxism in the University

When I taught the Classics of Political Theory, I used to introduce Karl Marx as “the least funny of the Marx Brothers”. But as I mentioned in an earlier piece in this site, “What Made American Academia Great and How It Was Destroyed”, this failed comedian’s ideas have infiltrated American Universities to the detriment of true learning. 

The core of Marxist ideology is economic class conflict (owners vs. workers; slaves vs. masters; capitalists vs. proletarians). Because of the social mobility in the American economy, this core Marxism never really took hold in our country. It was a joke in the 1930’s, at the height of American Communism, that more dues were paid to The Party by FBI informants than actual members! 

But CULTURAL Marxism succeeded in the American Left by casting everything in forms of “group conflict” (race, gender, religion, ethnic, etc.). In Chapter 13 of the textbook, THE HISTORY OF POLITICAL THEORY: Ancient Greece to Modern America, this “dialectic” of opposing but connected opposites leads to economic and political revolution, as in Russia, China, Cuba, etc.

In its cultural form, it leads to revolutions in all aspects of society: family, community, education, personal relations and everything else. This invaded the University in transforming the Humanities (History, English), Social Sciences (Government, Psychology, Sociology), and even Natural Sciences (Meteorology, Medicine. . .) from studying all perspectives and teaching the “best” to presenting the “conflict” between traditional subjects and radical perspectives.

Read the rest here on the Gen Z Conservative website...

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Other essays by Professor Sheldon:

Burke’s Catholic Conservatism

How to Avoid the Life Cycle and Death Spiral of a Republic

‘The System Worked’

John Rawls and Modern American Liberalism

Thomas Jefferson’s Conception of ‘Academic Freedom’ and Its Current Condition in American Higher Education