Christian Porter’s Bipolar accuser

In contrast with Cardinal Pell’s initial lack of support, there have been some powerful responses to the ABC mob after Attorney-General Christian Porter for alleged rape. But one important similarity between the Pell and Porter accusers is their mental and emotional health.

Despite the ban on the media to keep the identify and state-of-mind of Cardinal Pell’s accuser secret, information continues to dribble out. Merging all the information about ‘J’ or the ‘kid’, as he was variously referred to, one can form a picture of a man plagued by severe mental disorders.

While we rely on bits and pieces about Pell’s accuser, there is no such impediment with Porter’s. She suffered from bipolar disorder before killing herself – a common outcome of bipolar disorder. Bill Dawes in his ‘Accusations from the Realm of Madness’ (Quadrant, 10 March 2021) explains what the condition of bipolarity means.

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Accusations from the Realm of Madness

Bill Dawes, Quadrant, 10 March 2021

On Friday a reporter put this question to Attorney-General Christian Porter: “Why do you think this woman would come up with such an elaborate lie?” According to reports, the woman in question, who had accused Christian Porter of raping her in 1988, suffered bipolar disorder. If the reporter spent any time reviewing the experiences of people who suffer from bipolar he would not have asked such an asinine question.

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a diagnosis bestowed upon those who experience sweeping mood swings that range from depressive lows to manic highs. Those who suffer from bipolar are often clever, as this poor girl was reported to be, however they must stick to a strict routine of strong medication to prevent slipping into a psychotic state. When they do, it is routine to experience a recurrence of false memories of a violent and sexual nature that become embedded in the brain, only to reappear when another episode occurs.

“Ah, give me madness, you heavenly powers! Madness that I may at last believe in myself! Give deliriums and convulsions, sudden lights and darkness, terrify me with frost and fire such as no mortal has ever felt, with deafening din and prowling figures, make me howl and whine and crawl like a beast: so that I may come to believe in myself!”– Friedrich Nietzsche.

If our ace reporter wanted to find out more about the experiences of bipolar patients and how they come up with such elaborate stories, he could have simply turned to google to read confessions such as this from PenelopeAnn:

Read the rest here…

More articles about the Porter Affair are HERE.